Attending the Women’s March


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Women and children protesting at the Women’s March on Portland. (Photo: Kiara Yin-Husband)

Abbey Kester

Attending the Women’s March on Seattle was one of the most interesting things I’ve ever done. I say interesting because I feel that there is no better word to express the experience.

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Sign reading “Nasty Women Keep Fighting,” referencing Trump calling Clinton a “nasty woman” in one of the presidential debates. (Photo: Kiara Yin-Husband)

I went with my step-mother, which was maybe not the best decision, but due to circumstances beyond my control, that’s who I marched with. Before we left the house, we made signs. Now I saw a great many signs both during and after the march. This has led me to conclude that our signs sucked. They were pathetic and made us look like protester novices. (We were but you never want to look that way). My step-mother, Jane, wrote out “I march for kindness” on one piece of paper, and “I march for Paige, Abbey, David, Anders, and Me” on another, the names of my older sibling, me, and two of her coworkers. She then taped the backs of these papers together and called it good. I did not know what to write. So, I followed her example with the list of names, which I now regret. No one else did this. On the paper that I had taped to the front, I wrote a quote from Tina Fey: “Do your thing and don’t care if they like it.”  I used Tina Fey because she’s one of my great feminist role models, I haveing read her book more times than I can count. I regret my choice slightly less in retrospect, but I still regret it nonetheless. Most people made angry signs.

I wish I would’ve either made an angry sign or gone without.

Actually scratch that, I wish I had gone without.

I wish I would’ve either made an angry sign or gone without.

Actually, scratch that, I wish I had gone without.

The sign resulted in me having to constantly hold something. I would have much preferred to be hands-free, but I didn’t realize this beforehand. I also could’ve taken better pictures and pick things up for people when they dropped them. I know that this might seem like a strange idea, but I wanted to be able to help people. There were so many people there — coming from both sides of privilege — I just wanted to make their lives easier. Due to the same sentiment, I also wished I had more cash on me.

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Signs held in protest at the Women’s March on Portland. (Photo: Kiara Yin-Husband)

We did not join the march at the beginning of its three and a half mile journey, but rather a mile in. This was mostly due to the fact that Jane has bad hips and cannot walk too far. Where we joined the march soon did not matter as we joined the mass of people on the streets. As we marched, most people were quiet, keeping conversations between small groups that they were marching with. A few people stood on the sidewalk and shouted things at us, but it was tamer than I expected. The only real yelling that happened was that a sort of roar (everyone cheering) that worked its way back and forth along the crowd.

One of the most startling things was how many children were there. I can’t tell you if the kids were there because they wanted to be or if their parents made them, but nevertheless, there were a lot of them. One woman held up a sign around a baby strapped to someone else’s back that read “#WhyWeMarch.” To see these babies reminded me of why I was marching, but then I saw some other children that made me question everything.

There were maybe three of them. Two boys, one girl. They first drew my attention because their signs had been duct taped to nerf swords and I thought that was funny. But my smile faded when I saw that their signs read “Not My President.” This made me wonder; these were kids and if I recall, when I was a kid, I didn’t have the slightest notion about politics. I remember watching Obama’s original inauguration in 2008 in school, but I didn’t really understand the importance of it. I just did what my parents did. It made me think if these kids actually understood what they were marching for.

But I kept marching.

I didn’t really understand the importance of it. I just did what my parents did. It made me think if these kids actually understood what they were marching for.

I marched almost all the way to the Seattle Center and felt like I had completely fulfilled my feminist duty. In the end, the experience was rewarding and I would do it again, I just think that I would do some things differently.
UPDATE: VOTW has uploaded several new images of the Women’s March on Portland. All photos taken by Kiara Yin-Husband.

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The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of the Voice of the Warriors, Aloha High School, or the Beaverton School District.

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